Maricopa County Board of Supervisors (MCBOS) and the Arizona State Senate announced on Friday that they reached an agreement related to the state’s subpoenas for 2020 election material.

The agreement will allow a special master, former U.S. Rep. John Shadegg, to examine the routers and Splunk logs, which are internet activity logs.

According to the board of supervisors, the agreement will prove that there were no irregularities during the election.

“An independent third party can confirm what we’ve always said: the election equipment was not connected to the internet and no vote switching occurred. And our residents, law enforcement, and courts can all rest assured that their data and equipment are protected,” said MCBOS Chairman Jack Sellers.

However, leaders in the Senate celebrated the agreement.

“HUGE win for the Az Senate today! Maricopa settlement gives us all the data needed to complete the review of the routers & splunk log to the most comprehensive election audit in history. We got everything we need and more. Maricopa County goes home with its tail between its legs,” tweeted Senate President Karen Fann.

Previously, the county refused to provide the equipment to the state leaders. However, Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich announced that his office determined that the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors violated state law for failing to comply with the Arizona Senate’s legislative subpoena related to the 2020 election audit.

“We are notifying the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors that it must fully comply with the Senate’s subpoena as required by the law,” said Attorney General Mark Brnovich. “Our courts have spoken. The rule of law must be followed.”

The group had until September 27 to comply with the measure or risk losing approximately $676 million in state funding.

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Cooper Moran is a reporter for The Star News Network. Follow Cooper on Twitter. Email tips to cooperreports@gmail.com.
Background Photo “Arizona Capitol” by Gage Skidmore. CC BY-SA 2.0.